Post a quote

From socialmirrors.org
Jump to: navigation, search
Post-a-quote.png
Mohammed (attrib.)
William Shakespeare
Karl Marx
D.H. Lawrence


POST A QUOTE ON SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS OR ANY ASPECT OF ‘THE HUMAN CONDITION’

Contributions to this page welcome! Click the EDIT button to add your quote or email it via Contact and write ‘Quote’ in the message subject box. Pictures can be included – provided no copyright is violated. Most recent quotes are at the BOTTOM ▼ so please add yours there too – it’s more likely to get read.

Click on a picture or author’s name in the contents menu (other pictures below)



Post-a-quote2.png
Victor Turner
The Koran
The Bible
Charles Darwin


Attributed to Mohammed

I was a hidden treasure and desired to be known, so created creation in order to be known.
From the Hadiths – sayings attributed to Mohammed but not necessarily authenticated as such by Islamic scholars

William Shakespeare

JAQUES: All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts...
As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII, lines 139-42

PROSPERO: We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep…
The Tempest, Act IV, Scene I, lines 156-8

TOP▲

Karl Marx and Frederick Engels

Men can be distinguished from animals by consciousness, by religion or anything else you like. They themselves begin to distinguish themselves from animals as soon as they begin to produce their means of subsistence, a step which is conditioned by their physical organization… As individuals express their life, so they are. What they are, therefore, coincides with their production, both with what they produce and with how they produce. The nature of individuals thus depends on the material conditions determining their production… Life is not determined by consciousness, but consciousness by life.
The German Ideology, 1846, English translation ed. C.J. Arthur (London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1974) pp. 42 & 47

TOP▲

D.H. Lawrence

But the moment man became aware of himself he made a picture of himself, and began to live from the picture: that is, from without inwards. This is truly the reversal of life. And this is how we live. We spend all our time over the picture. “A good little girl” – “a brave boy” – “a noble woman” – “a strong man” – “a productive society” – “a progressive humanity” – it is all the picture. It is all living from the outside to the inside. It is all the death of spontaneity. It is all, strictly, automatic... If we could once get into our heads – or if we once dare admit to one another – that we are not the picture, and the picture is not what we are, then we might lay a new hold on life.
Review of The Social Basis of Consciousness (Trigant Burrow 1927) in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, 1936 (London: William Heinemann) p. 380

TO WOMEN, AS FAR AS I’M CONCERNED
If people say they’ve got feelings, you may be pretty sure they haven’t got them.
Pansies, in D.H. Lawrence: Selected Poems, 1950 (Harmondsworth: Penguin) p. 152

From LIZARD
If men were as much men as lizards are lizards, they’d be worth looking at
Ibid. p. 156

From TRUST
And be, oh be
a sun to me,
not a weary, insistent
personality
Ibid. p. 160

TOP▲

Jerry Springer

[On being accused of dumbing-down America]
I just hold up a mirror to society

TOP▲

Trigant Burrow

It would appear that in his separativeness man has inadvertently fallen a victim to the developmental exigencies of his own consciousness. Captivated by the phylogenetically new and unwonted spectacle of his own image, it would seem he has been irresistibly arrested before the mirror of his own likeness and that in the present self-conscious phase of his mental evolution he is still standing spellbound before it. That such is the case with man is not remarkable. For the appearance of the phenomenon of consciousness marked a complete severance from all that was his past. Here was broken the chain of evolutionary events whose links extended back through the nebulous æons of our remotest ancestry, and in the first moment of his consciousness man stood, for the first time, alone. It was in this moment that he was ‘created’, as the legend runs, ‘in the image and likeness of God.’ For, breaking with the teleological traditions of his age-long biology, man now became suddenly aware.

The Social Basis of Consciousness, 1927, cited in Phoenix, 1936 (London: William Heinemann) pp. 378-9

TOP▲

William James

Articulate reasons are cogent for us only when our inarticulate feelings of reality have already been impressed in favour of the same conclusion. The unreasoned and immediate assurance is the deep thing in us, the reasoned argument is but a surface exhibition. Instinct leads, intelligence does but follow

The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature, 1902 (London & Glasgow: Fontana Library, Collins, 1960) p. 88

No account of the universe in its totality can be final which leaves these other forms of consciousness [religious experiences] quite disregarded. How to regard them is the question – for they are so discontinuous with ordinary consciousness. Yet they may determine attitudes though they cannot furnish formulas, and open up a region though they fail to give a map. At any rate, they forbid a premature closing of our accounts with reality.

Ibid, pp. 373-4

TOP▲

Thomas Kuhn

Let us then assume that crises are a necessary precondition for the emergence of novel theories and ask next how scientists respond to their existence. Part of the answer, as obvious as it is important, can be discovered by noting first what scientists never do when confronted by even severe and prolonged anomalies. Though they may begin to lose faith and then to consider alternatives, they do not renounce the paradigm that has led them into crisis. They do not, that is, treat anomalies as counter-instances, though in the vocabulary of the philosophy of science that is what they are.

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 1962 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970) p. 77

TOP▲

Pierre Bourdieu

Let us then assume that crises are a necessary precondition for the emergence of novel theories and ask next how scientists respond to their existence. Part of the answer, as obvious as it is important, can be discovered by noting first what scientists never do when confronted by even severe and prolonged anomalies. Though they may begin to lose faith and then to consider alternatives, they do not renounce the paradigm that has led them into crisis. They do not, that is, treat anomalies as counter-instances, though in the vocabulary of the philosophy of science that is what they are.

Outline of a Theory of Practice, 1972, trans. R. Nice (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977) p. 164

TOP▲

Wilhelm Dilthey

Our knowledge of what is given in experience is extended through the interpretation of the objectifications of life [expressed by others through performative display] and this interpretation, in turn, is only made possible by plumbing the depths of subjective experience.

Selected Writings, 1883-1911, ed. H.P. Rickman (London: Cambridge University Press, 1976)

TOP▲

Victor Turner

For me, the anthropology of performance is an essential part of the anthropology of experience. In a sense, every type of cultural performance, including ritual, ceremony, carnival, theatre, and poetry, is explanation and explication of life itself… Through the performance process itself, what is normally sealed up, inaccessible to everyday observation and reasoning, in the depth of sociocultural life, is drawn forth… A performance, then, is the proper finale of an experience.

From Ritual to Theatre: The Human Seriousness of Play, 1982 (New York: Performing Arts Journal Publications) p. 13

TOP▲

Barbara Myerhoff

[Cultural performances are] reflective in the sense of showing ourselves to ourselves. They are also capable of being reflexive, arousing consciousness of ourselves as we see ourselves. As heroes in our own dramas, we are made self aware, conscious of our consciousness. At once actor and audience, we may then come into the fullness of our human capability – and perhaps human desire to watch ourselves and enjoy knowing what we know.

Life History among the Elderly: Performance, Visibility, and remembering, n.d.

TOP▲

Claude Lévi Strauss

Absence of rules seems to provide the surest criterion for distinguishing a natural from a cultural process.

The Elementary Structures of Kinship, 1949, ed. Rodney Needham (Boston: Beacon Press, 1969) p.8

TOP▲

William Blake

To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.

Auguries of Innocence, c. 1803, in William Blake, ed. J. Bronowski (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1958) p.96


Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion.

Proverbs of Hell, c. 1793, in William Blake, ed. J. Bronowski (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1958) p.96

TOP▲

Herman Bauman

In those days men knew nothing of death; they understood the language of animals and lived at peace with them; they did no work at all, they found abundant food within their reach.

Schopfung und Erzeit des Menschen im Mythos afrikanischer Volker, 1936 (Berlin) p. 267

TOP▲

George F.R. Ellis

In a reductionist world view, physics is all there is. The Cartesian picture of man as a machine seems to be vindicated. But this view omits important aspects of the world that physics has yet to come to terms with. Our environment is dominated by objects that embody the outcomes of intentional design (buildings, books, computers, teaspoons). Today’s physics has nothing to say about the intentionality that has resulted in the existence of such objects, even though this intentionality is clearly causally effective.

'Physics, complexity and causality’ Nature 435, 743 (9 June 2005)

TOP▲

Carl Jung

We have no reason to suppose that the specific structure of the psyche is the only thing in the world that has no history.

‘Conscious, unconscious, and individuation’ (1939), in Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, i, 1959 (Princeton: Princeton University Press), p. 287.

TOP▲

The Koran

We created man to try him with afflictions.

The City, English translation by N.J. Dawood (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1956) p. 31

TOP▲

The Bible

And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?

Genesis, Chapter 3, verse 11

TOP▲

The Koran

We created man to try him with afflictions.

The City, English translation by N.J. Dawood (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1956) p. 31

TOP▲

The Bible

And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?

Genesis, Chapter 3, verse 11

TOP▲

Charles Darwin

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

From UPAYA newsletter 22/09/08 (unreferenced)

TOP▲



Contributions to this page welcome! Click the EDIT button to add your quote or email it via Contact_TOP and write ‘Quote’ in the message subject box. Pictures can be included – provided no copyright is violated.



Your title here

body text goes here.....

Caption goes here



Bottom